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Masato Ogawa, Ed.D

Education


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Masato Ogawa, Ed.D

Associate Professor of Education
Social Studies Education
Office: KO 174R
Phone: (765)-455-9448
E-mail: mogawa@iuk.edu



CV

Dr. Masato Ogawa is currently an Associate Professor of Education within the School of Education at Indiana University Kokomo.  He teaches elementary and secondary social studies methods, the Freshman Learning Community, foundations of education, secondary education methods, economic education, and East Asian Studies.  He received the Indiana University Trustees Teaching Award in 2009 and 2011.  In addition to his work in classrooms, he serves as the faculty advisor for meshed, the secondary education student organization. He has been the Associate Director of the Center for Economic Education.  He has organized various economic education workshops for in- and pre-service teachers in the Indiana University Kokomo service area.  He also served as the Director of the Indiana University President Diversity Initiative Summer Diversity Program, an initiative designed to introduce minority students to careers in Nursing, Business, Education, and SPEA.  In 2009, he was awarded the first Chancellor’s Diversity Excellence Award as his work is grounded in the themes of international affairs, diversity, and multicultural education.

Dr. Ogawa’s focus in international studies through the lens of social studies education, diversity and multicultural education, and social studies education in the United States has afforded him the opportunity to conduct several research studies with scholars from the United States and abroad.  He has published five articles in peer-reviewed international and national journals during his time at Indiana University Kokomo.  His book chapter will be published in fall 2011, and three articles will be published in 2012.  In addition to those publications, he has made numerous research presentations at international, national, and state/regional conferences.  His three international presentations were at the invitations of the Japanese Educational Research Association for the Social Studies and the Japanese Civic Education Association, and the majority of his other research presentations were at the National Council for the Social Studies and the American Educational Research Association conferences, both of which are highly respected professional gatherings in the field of social studies education and educational research. 

Dr. Ogawa has been a very high profile with regard to service in profession.  He has acted as chair and vice-chair of the National Council for the Social Studies International Activities Committee, reviewer for the Council’s conference planning committee, and as Adopt-A-School Project Coordinator for the Council’s International Assembly.  He also serves as a member of Board of Directors for the Japanese Educational Research Association for the Social Studies.  In 2010 and 2011, he was instrumental in organizing a delegation of Japanese scholars specializing social studies to visit local schools, to observe his social studies methods classes, and to gain knowledge of teaching practices and theories.  He also has hosted a visiting researcher, Professor Takeshi Miyazaki at Soka University, Tokyo, Japan   from April 2011 to March 2012.  Professor Miyazaki and he have been co-researching on the topics of service learning in teacher education.

Dr. Ogawa earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in social studies education from the University of Georgia.  He previously taught social studies and Japanese at Ontario High School, Ontario, Oregon.  In 2004, he received one of four Teaching 9/11 Best Practices Awards presented by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. He was honored for a lesson plan that looked at the limits of governmental authority during wartime. In the lesson, high school students consider two examples—U.S. government treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II and the USA PATRIOT Act, enacted after terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

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